Live-streaming gear I’d use for a smaller church

Live-streaming gear I’d use for a smaller church

I was thinking about what live-streaming gear I’d get if I had a little money to do a better stream. I’ve already got a computer and cables, so that’s taken care of, but I’d love to get an HD switcher, a couple of cameras, and a couple decent tripods. Since I really had HDMI over long distances, I’d want to change the HDMI that a consumer camcorder comes with to SDI.

Here’s what I came up with: Live-streaming gear (affiliate link).

It’s a BlackMagic ATEM Television Studio for the switcher, 2 Magnus VT-4000 tripods, 2 Excelvan mini hdmi to SDI converters, 2 Canon Vixia HF R500 camcorders, a Behringer Xenyx 802, and a Teredek Vidiu encoder.

There are a few things missing, though. I already have a macbook pro that I’d use for graphics and control of the ATEM. I have various cables including XLRs, BNCs, and a couple HDMIs. I have microphones. I also have a light kit.

If I was using this in a church or during a concert or something, I’d also need a comm system to communicate with camera ops.

So, I think that while this system isn’t cheap at about $2,400 (give or take), it would do what most churches need (not larger churches mind you, but smaller ones).

Hope it helps someone. 😉

Paul

For more on the type of gear I’d recommend, check out this episode of Tech, No Babel that I did on Live-streaming gear.

Paul Alan Clifford, M.Div.

Paul Alan Clifford, M.Div. has been a tech volunteer with Quest Community Church in Lexington, KY since 2000 and is the founder of TrinityDigitalMedia.com, llc. He became part of the technology in ministry team when his church’s attendance was around 200 in one Sunday service and has witnessed it’s growth to 5,200 average weekly attendance in one Saturday service, four Sunday services in one online and two physical campuses. He literally wrote the book on podcasting in churches, twitter in churches, & servant-hearted volunteering, as well as writing various articles for publications like “Church Production” and “Technologies for Worship” magazines.