Podcasting: Naming Podcast Episodes | Tech Help for Churches

Podcasting: Naming Podcast Episodes

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On today’s Tech Help for Churches, Podcasting: Naming Podcast Episodes

Podcast episode names shouldn’t be random. There’s a specific formula I use to make sure it’s findable, you know what’s covered, and you know which podcast it is and when it was released.

When I’m naming podcast episodes, I start with a keyword. In the case of this episode, that keyword is “podcasting.” Then, you have a more specific title, “Naming Podcast Episodes” which tells you which aspect of podcasting I’m covering.

If you want to think of this as series title and weekly title (where you avoid clever names and use terms people are actually searching for), that might work.

Next, I have an abbreviation for the show. “THFC” is short for “Tech Help for Churches,” so you know if you liked previous episodes (or want more of similar content, look for THFC).

Finally, I use a date format that’s computer friendly. In this case, it’s 160111. That means YYMMDD. Why don’t I do the four-digit year? I don’t think anyone is going to be confused about what century this was made in. No one is going to find this in 100 years and think, “Was this made in 2116, 1916, or 2016?” Mp4s didn’t exist in 1916 and will probably not exist in 2116.

If you only have the numbers, your computer will group episodes by year, then month, then date. That’s what you want. If you add the abbreviation before the date, when you’re naming podcast episodes, you’ll get a further grouping by show.

Episode number and seasons really don’t help anyone. Sure, if a podcast has 135 episodes, you know that they’re not going to quit after 4, but you won’t remember which content is on which one. Seasons seem even more confusing. Podcasting doesn’t have breaks, so splitting it into “seasons” is unnatural and confusing to the audience. It might help you know when something was recorded, but unless it’s one season is one year, it really won’t help anyone else.

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Paul Alan Clifford, M.Div.

Paul Alan Clifford, M.Div. has been a tech volunteer with Lexington City Church (formerly Quest Community Church) in Lexington, KY since 2000 and is the founder of TrinityDigitalMedia.com, llc. He became part of the technology in ministry team when his church’s attendance was around 200 in one Sunday service and has witnessed it’s growth to a peak of 5,200 average weekly attendance in one Saturday service, four Sunday services in one online and two physical campuses. He literally wrote the book on podcasting in churches, twitter in churches, & servant-hearted volunteering, as well as writing various articles for publications like “Church Production” and “Technologies for Worship” magazines. He has thousands of members of his ProPresenter Users' Group on Facebook and thousands of subscribers to his YouTube channel.